Young Minds: Bullying

Get help for bullying

Ignoring bullying won’t make it go away. You need to tell someone about what is happening.
If the bullying is happening at school Talk to your parents or carers and your teacher. Your teacher may have no idea that you are being bullied, and the school will have an anti-bullying policy to tackle it. If you feel you can’t speak to your teacher, maybe a friend can do it for you. You can also speak to a school counsellor, welfare officer or nurse. In extreme cases, if bullying is interfering with your education it may be possible for you to change schools if it doesn’t stop once you have reported it.
If the bullying is happening outside school Talk to your parents or carers, close relatives such as grandparents, aunties and uncles, or even your friends’ parents. Youth workers and leaders may be able to help too. If the bullying is happening online Tell a trusted adult – your parents or carers, or a teacher. You can report abusive posts on Facebook and other social media platforms. You can also report abuse to CEOP (Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre). Keep reporting the bullying until it stops. It may not stop the first time you tell your parents or teacher and they try to stop it. If the bullying continues, tell them again. Don’t put up with it. No one deserves to be bullied.

NSPCC: Bullying

Bullying and cyberbullying

Advice for parents and carers to help keep children safe from bullying, wherever it happens.

Family Lives

Family Lives provides targeted early intervention and crisis support to families.

Victim Support: Bullying

Bullying

Bullying is when someone keeps doing something to you on purpose that hurts or upsets you. Bullying is still bullying even if it happens behind your back, if it is not physical or if it’s done by one person or a group. This content has been written for children and young people. If you’re looking for information for over 18s, visit our Types of Crime information about harassment. Bullying may be:
  • physical (hitting you)
  • emotional (spreading hurtful rumours)
  • verbal (calling you names), or
  • bullying within your social group (leaving you out of things)

What can I do?

Being bullied can make you feel upset, worried, sad or angry, and it may feel like you’re trying to deal with this all on your own. If you have fallen out with your friends or you feel that your friends are bullying you, remember that it doesn’t have to be like this forever. Things can get better. Lots of young people find that talking to someone can really help.
  • Tell an adult you trust. This could be a teacher, a family member, your youth worker or support worker. Tell them what is going on and ask for their help and advice.
  • Talk to your support worker, youth worker or the adult you trust about putting together a safety plan. This can include things like finding ways to stay safe at school, travelling to and from school safely, and where you can go or who you can talk to whenever you feel afraid or threatened.
  • Most schools or youth organisations will have an anti-bullying policy, which means that they have a plan of what to do and how they can help you. They will probably have dealt with this many times before.
  • Your school, youth worker or support worker will also be able to give you some practical advice on dealing with bullying. This might include taking positive action by learning how to be more assertive and how to control situations, learning to ignore comments or teasing (bullies will always look for a reaction), and understanding that fighting back, or fighting to keep possessions, can often make the situation worse or put you at greater risk.
  • Talk to your friends. A good friend will listen to you and may help you speak to an adult.