Childline: Mental Health

We want to know what's making you feel good. 

Get support

We're here for you on the phone or online. Or try getting support from other young people on our message boards.

Family Lives

Family Lives provides targeted early intervention and crisis support to families.

Impetus

Over 2 million young people live in poverty in Britain today. They do less well at school, are less likely to make it to university and struggle to find and keep jobs. The figures are stark.

Our Approach

NSPCC

Childline Supporting children and young people for over 35 years

Our Childline service gives children and young people a voice when no one else is listening. Whatever problems or dangers they face, we give them somewhere to turn to for support when they need it.

NSPCC: Bullying

Bullying and cyberbullying

Advice for parents and carers to help keep children safe from bullying, wherever it happens.

Save the Children

EVERY CHILD HAS THE RIGHT TO LEARN

Our child education programmes reached 12 million children in 2020.

The Childrens Society

Supporting young carers

Young carers are children who look after a friend or family member. Their extra responsibilities often mean they miss out on school and hanging out with friends. It can sideline their whole childhood. We help them find balance, give them space to enjoy being young and support them into adulthood so they can pursue their dreams outside of caring.

This Mix

How to cope as a young carer

Being a young carer can sometimes be overwhelming – The Mix provide tips on how to cope when you’re finding caring difficult.

Am I a young carer? 

You may not see yourself as carer; caring for a friend or family member is just a part of your life and it feels pretty normal  But officially, you’re recognised as young carer if you’re under 18 and looking after someone who’s sickdisabled or has mental health or addiction issues. If you’re caring for someone and you’re aged 18-25, you’re officially seen as a young adult carer. 

What kind of thing do young carers do?

Caring can range from small tasks to round-the-clock care. You might be doing the shopping and housework, providing emotional support for a family friend, helping to get your sister ready for school or making sure your dad takes his medicine.

Being a young carer can be difficult 

Firstly, if you’re a young or young adult carer – you’re amazing. Taking care of someone is a kind and brilliant thing to do, and it can have so many rewards. You get to help someone you love; you learn loads about looking after someone, and you can see how much your care has changed their life for the better.  But caring can also be tough, lonely and stressful. If you feel that way sometimes – that’s ok, and we’re here to help.

Victim Support: Bullying

Bullying

Bullying is when someone keeps doing something to you on purpose that hurts or upsets you. Bullying is still bullying even if it happens behind your back, if it is not physical or if it’s done by one person or a group. This content has been written for children and young people. If you’re looking for information for over 18s, visit our Types of Crime information about harassment. Bullying may be:
  • physical (hitting you)
  • emotional (spreading hurtful rumours)
  • verbal (calling you names), or
  • bullying within your social group (leaving you out of things)

What can I do?

Being bullied can make you feel upset, worried, sad or angry, and it may feel like you’re trying to deal with this all on your own. If you have fallen out with your friends or you feel that your friends are bullying you, remember that it doesn’t have to be like this forever. Things can get better. Lots of young people find that talking to someone can really help.
  • Tell an adult you trust. This could be a teacher, a family member, your youth worker or support worker. Tell them what is going on and ask for their help and advice.
  • Talk to your support worker, youth worker or the adult you trust about putting together a safety plan. This can include things like finding ways to stay safe at school, travelling to and from school safely, and where you can go or who you can talk to whenever you feel afraid or threatened.
  • Most schools or youth organisations will have an anti-bullying policy, which means that they have a plan of what to do and how they can help you. They will probably have dealt with this many times before.
  • Your school, youth worker or support worker will also be able to give you some practical advice on dealing with bullying. This might include taking positive action by learning how to be more assertive and how to control situations, learning to ignore comments or teasing (bullies will always look for a reaction), and understanding that fighting back, or fighting to keep possessions, can often make the situation worse or put you at greater risk.
  • Talk to your friends. A good friend will listen to you and may help you speak to an adult.

Young Minds

The sheer scale of the problem we’re faced with can feel overwhelming. More young people than ever before need support for their mental health and accessing that support quickly, can make a critical difference to those young people. Yet, most of the time those young people need to wait. And wait. And wait. When it feels like nothing is there for you when you need it most, you feel alone. For far too many young people, this is their reality. When they need help and can’t get it, it feels like they’re being told they don’t matter. We have called our strategy ‘You Matter’ because, ultimately, that is what this is all about. We need young people to know that whatever they are going through, they matter and they deserve help. And each and every one of us needs to acknowledge that, to those young people, we matter and the role we can play is vital.

Young Minds: Bullying

Get help for bullying

Ignoring bullying won’t make it go away. You need to tell someone about what is happening.
If the bullying is happening at school Talk to your parents or carers and your teacher. Your teacher may have no idea that you are being bullied, and the school will have an anti-bullying policy to tackle it. If you feel you can’t speak to your teacher, maybe a friend can do it for you. You can also speak to a school counsellor, welfare officer or nurse. In extreme cases, if bullying is interfering with your education it may be possible for you to change schools if it doesn’t stop once you have reported it.
If the bullying is happening outside school Talk to your parents or carers, close relatives such as grandparents, aunties and uncles, or even your friends’ parents. Youth workers and leaders may be able to help too. If the bullying is happening online Tell a trusted adult – your parents or carers, or a teacher. You can report abusive posts on Facebook and other social media platforms. You can also report abuse to CEOP (Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre). Keep reporting the bullying until it stops. It may not stop the first time you tell your parents or teacher and they try to stop it. If the bullying continues, tell them again. Don’t put up with it. No one deserves to be bullied.

Young Minds: How to deal with problems at school

Problems at school

School can be a place that we enjoy but for some of us, it can be a tough time. If you are finding school difficult, there are ways that you can get the help you deserve.