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Welcome to our Carers Shop, including handpicked services and products to help you.

As a social business we invest our profits into our mission to support family carers all over the UK.

Showing 1–18 of 873 results

Jamie Oliver: Student Recipes

EASY STUDENT RECIPES

Kick off term-time with our easy student recipes. We’ve got basic how-to guides, easy veggie meals like this veggie chilli and quick and easy dishes including this speedy stir-fry. Plus ideas for delicious meals that are packed with flavour and perfect for feeding friends.

Tesco Real Food

Student recipes

Fending for yourself at university doesn't have to be daunting, and these delicious recipes and helpful hacks make cooking as a student super simple and affordable. From tasty sharing snacks to easy budget meals, we've got you covered.
  • The definitive guide to easy student meals

UniDays Gym Memberships

Gym

Get fit with UNiDAYS - work out for less with student discount on the best gym memberships.

Puregym Student Membership

To grab a discount on your student gym membership, simply verify with UNiDAYS on the site, then follow the steps to sign up. UK students can enjoy access to high quality workout equipment, expert Personal Trainers and an exciting variety of exercise classes, all with up to 30% off! So, whether you’re into lifting, running, cycling or just looking for a first rate fitness class to get your blood pumping, PureGym will have what you need, for less.

Save the Student

How to get cheaper gym membership

Whether you genuinely want to keep fit and healthy, or you're just in it for the Snapchat fodder, here's how to bag your gym membership for less. Avid gym-goers not only get to burn off steam, stress and calories, but they also earn ultimate kudos too. Sadly though, ultimate kudos doesn't come cheap. The average gym membership in the UK comes in at a whopping £40 a month. We've smashed our money-saving brains together and have found options that'll set you back around a tenner – a quarter of the average national price. Add saving on a gym membership to money you could make from just walking everywhere and you'll be fit as a fiddle in no time at no extra cost!

Young Minds: Family Support

Counselling and therapy

Often when we're struggling, counselling and therapy can make a big difference. Find out what happens during counselling and therapy and how it can help you feel better.

NHS Counselling

Counselling

Counselling is a talking therapy that involves a trained therapist listening to you and helping you find ways to deal with emotional issues. Sometimes the term "counselling" is used to refer to talking therapies in general, but counselling is also a type of therapy in its own right.

Relate

Family Counselling

Families can be a source of support, encouragement and love but sometimes relationships within families are put under strain and family members feel isolated or overlooked.
Family counselling can help when siblings aren’t getting on, or when parents and children are going through a divorce or separation. Forming a new family is a challenge and it is at this point that many parents contact Relate for some support to help everyone settle. Whatever difficulties you're having as a family, we can help

Victim Support: Bullying

Bullying

Bullying is when someone keeps doing something to you on purpose that hurts or upsets you. Bullying is still bullying even if it happens behind your back, if it is not physical or if it’s done by one person or a group. This content has been written for children and young people. If you’re looking for information for over 18s, visit our Types of Crime information about harassment. Bullying may be:
  • physical (hitting you)
  • emotional (spreading hurtful rumours)
  • verbal (calling you names), or
  • bullying within your social group (leaving you out of things)

What can I do?

Being bullied can make you feel upset, worried, sad or angry, and it may feel like you’re trying to deal with this all on your own. If you have fallen out with your friends or you feel that your friends are bullying you, remember that it doesn’t have to be like this forever. Things can get better. Lots of young people find that talking to someone can really help.
  • Tell an adult you trust. This could be a teacher, a family member, your youth worker or support worker. Tell them what is going on and ask for their help and advice.
  • Talk to your support worker, youth worker or the adult you trust about putting together a safety plan. This can include things like finding ways to stay safe at school, travelling to and from school safely, and where you can go or who you can talk to whenever you feel afraid or threatened.
  • Most schools or youth organisations will have an anti-bullying policy, which means that they have a plan of what to do and how they can help you. They will probably have dealt with this many times before.
  • Your school, youth worker or support worker will also be able to give you some practical advice on dealing with bullying. This might include taking positive action by learning how to be more assertive and how to control situations, learning to ignore comments or teasing (bullies will always look for a reaction), and understanding that fighting back, or fighting to keep possessions, can often make the situation worse or put you at greater risk.
  • Talk to your friends. A good friend will listen to you and may help you speak to an adult.

Family Lives

Family Lives provides targeted early intervention and crisis support to families.

NSPCC: Bullying

Bullying and cyberbullying

Advice for parents and carers to help keep children safe from bullying, wherever it happens.

NSPCC

Childline Supporting children and young people for over 35 years

Our Childline service gives children and young people a voice when no one else is listening. Whatever problems or dangers they face, we give them somewhere to turn to for support when they need it.

Childline: Mental Health

We want to know what's making you feel good. 

Get support

We're here for you on the phone or online. Or try getting support from other young people on our message boards.

This Mix

How to cope as a young carer

Being a young carer can sometimes be overwhelming – The Mix provide tips on how to cope when you’re finding caring difficult.

Am I a young carer? 

You may not see yourself as carer; caring for a friend or family member is just a part of your life and it feels pretty normal  But officially, you’re recognised as young carer if you’re under 18 and looking after someone who’s sickdisabled or has mental health or addiction issues. If you’re caring for someone and you’re aged 18-25, you’re officially seen as a young adult carer. 

What kind of thing do young carers do?

Caring can range from small tasks to round-the-clock care. You might be doing the shopping and housework, providing emotional support for a family friend, helping to get your sister ready for school or making sure your dad takes his medicine.

Being a young carer can be difficult 

Firstly, if you’re a young or young adult carer – you’re amazing. Taking care of someone is a kind and brilliant thing to do, and it can have so many rewards. You get to help someone you love; you learn loads about looking after someone, and you can see how much your care has changed their life for the better.  But caring can also be tough, lonely and stressful. If you feel that way sometimes – that’s ok, and we’re here to help.

Macmillan

Support groups for young carers

Joining a support group is a great way to relax and meet other young carers. You can make friends with people who understand what you are going through and get emotional support. Many young carers find that support groups are fun. Meetings sometimes include activities, a social event or a talk from a guest speaker. You can share as little or much as you like with others. You may want to talk about cancer and your caring role, but you will probably chat about all sorts of things. Your school or college may already have a support group. You can also ask your GP, school nurse or look online to see if there is one in your area. We have a search tool called In your area, which you can use to find local support groups. If there is no support group that you can go to locally, you can set one up. You could also encourage your school to set up a support group. Your teachers can find information about this on the Carers Trust website.

Action for Children

We can’t take away a parent’s illness, but we can give young carers a break. Our services help young people balance caring with being a child

A young carer is someone under 18 who looks after a parent or another family member. They take on physical and emotional duties that adults usually handle. It can feel scary and isolating. Our support helps young carers come to terms with their parent's or other family member’s illness or condition. We teach them how to cope, and guide them to build positive relationships outside the family. We help young carers plan for the future, by making sure they can access adult services when they’re 18.

Family Action

Young Carers Services

Supporting Young Carers in their caring role and in realising their own potential.

Barnardo’s

All children deserve a childhood

Some children aren’t able to enjoy the simple things many children take for granted, because they are caring for someone in their family who is ill or disabled.

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